Share

Heal your body, heal your brain.

A podcast by Dhru Purohit and Dr. Mark Hyman

The Broken Brain podcast will help you take your brain health to the next level and teach you how to live your best life! Listen as host and serial entrepreneur Dhru Purohit interviews the top experts in the field of neu... More
Latest Episode
2019-8-15

#68: Is There an Optimal Diet for Humans? with Anahad O'Connor

Season 1, Ep. 68

Nutrition experts have long debated whether there is an optimal diet that humans evolved to eat. Studies show that modern hunter-gatherer groups across the globe generally have phenomenal heart and metabolic health, yet they eat a variety of diets, and tend to avoid the chronic diseases that kill most Americans. 


On today’s Broken Brain Podcast, our host, Dhru, talks to Anahad O’Connor, a bestselling author and reporter for The New York Times. He joined the paper in 2003 and writes for Science Times – the paper’s weekly science and health section – and the Well blog. Anahad covers nutrition, medicine and chronic disease. He has published a number of groundbreaking investigative stories for the Times, including a series in 2015 that exposed Coca-Cola’s funding of scientific research that sought to downplay the role of sugar-sweetened beverages in the obesity epidemic. In 2018, he and his colleagues won an award from the Association of HealthCare Journalists for Planet Fat, a series that examined the food industry’s role in the spread of global obesity. 


Anahad is a graduate of Yale University and is a frequent guest on national news programs, such as PBS NewsHour, Good Morning America, and NPR’s All Things Considered. He is also the author of four books.


In this episode, Dhru and Anahad talk about what life is like in hunter-gatherer societies, what a typical hunter-gatherer diet looks like, the challenges that are faced in these societies, and if there really is an optimal diet for humans. They talk about time-restricted eating and how when you eat could be more important than what you eat, how food variety causes you to eat more, something known as sensory-specific satiety, and why this is one of the reasons people in hunter-gatherer socieites don’t overeat and become obese. They also discuss another article Anahad wrote in the New York Times, How to Get Strong, and how everyone knows that exercise is one of the best things you can do for your health, but most people ignore one crucial component of it: resistance training and how it can reverse the age-related cellular damage that contributes to sarcopenia and functional impairment. 


In this episode, we dive into:


-Modern hunter-gatherer societies and why they tend to avoid chronic diseases (3:09)

-The importance of eating local and seasonal foods (14:56)

-Time-restricted eating (17:47)

-Why food variety causes your to eat more (24:08) 

-Nature’s perfect food (31:04)

-Anahad’s groundbreaking investigative report that exposed Coca-Cola’s funding of scientific research that sought to downplay the role of sugar-sweetened beverages in the obesity epidemic (41:23)

-The impact of lifestyle and social connections on overall health (53:22)

-Longevity and resistance training (1:02:07) 

-How to make resistance training practical (1:11:13)

-Learn more about Anahad and his work (1:19:06)


For more on Anahad O’Connor, be sure to follow him on Twitter @anahadoconnor, and check out his articles for the New York Times, right here.

2019-8-15

#68: Is There an Optimal Diet for Humans? with Anahad O'Connor

Season 1, Ep. 68

Nutrition experts have long debated whether there is an optimal diet that humans evolved to eat. Studies show that modern hunter-gatherer groups across the globe generally have phenomenal heart and metabolic health, yet they eat a variety of diets, and tend to avoid the chronic diseases that kill most Americans. 


On today’s Broken Brain Podcast, our host, Dhru, talks to Anahad O’Connor, a bestselling author and reporter for The New York Times. He joined the paper in 2003 and writes for Science Times – the paper’s weekly science and health section – and the Well blog. Anahad covers nutrition, medicine and chronic disease. He has published a number of groundbreaking investigative stories for the Times, including a series in 2015 that exposed Coca-Cola’s funding of scientific research that sought to downplay the role of sugar-sweetened beverages in the obesity epidemic. In 2018, he and his colleagues won an award from the Association of HealthCare Journalists for Planet Fat, a series that examined the food industry’s role in the spread of global obesity. 


Anahad is a graduate of Yale University and is a frequent guest on national news programs, such as PBS NewsHour, Good Morning America, and NPR’s All Things Considered. He is also the author of four books.


In this episode, Dhru and Anahad talk about what life is like in hunter-gatherer societies, what a typical hunter-gatherer diet looks like, the challenges that are faced in these societies, and if there really is an optimal diet for humans. They talk about time-restricted eating and how when you eat could be more important than what you eat, how food variety causes you to eat more, something known as sensory-specific satiety, and why this is one of the reasons people in hunter-gatherer socieites don’t overeat and become obese. They also discuss another article Anahad wrote in the New York Times, How to Get Strong, and how everyone knows that exercise is one of the best things you can do for your health, but most people ignore one crucial component of it: resistance training and how it can reverse the age-related cellular damage that contributes to sarcopenia and functional impairment. 


In this episode, we dive into:


-Modern hunter-gatherer societies and why they tend to avoid chronic diseases (3:09)

-The importance of eating local and seasonal foods (14:56)

-Time-restricted eating (17:47)

-Why food variety causes your to eat more (24:08) 

-Nature’s perfect food (31:04)

-Anahad’s groundbreaking investigative report that exposed Coca-Cola’s funding of scientific research that sought to downplay the role of sugar-sweetened beverages in the obesity epidemic (41:23)

-The impact of lifestyle and social connections on overall health (53:22)

-Longevity and resistance training (1:02:07) 

-How to make resistance training practical (1:11:13)

-Learn more about Anahad and his work (1:19:06)


For more on Anahad O’Connor, be sure to follow him on Twitter @anahadoconnor, and check out his articles for the New York Times, right here.

2019-8-8

#67: The Keys to Unlocking Your Larger-Than-Life Dream with Alex Banayan

Season 1, Ep. 67

The hardest part about achieving a dream often isn’t actually achieving it, it’s stepping through your fear of the unknown when you don’t have a clear plan. Having a teacher or boss tell you what to do makes life a lot easier. But nobody achieves a dream from the comfort of certainty. 


On today’s Broken Brain Podcast, our host, Dhru, talks to Alex Banayan, the only national bestselling business author under 30 in America. His book, The Third Door: The Wild Quest to Uncover How the World’s Most Successful People Launched Their Careers, has been translated into more than a dozen languages. Over the course of his unprecedented seven-year journey, Alex interviewed the most innovative leaders of the past half-century, including Bill Gates, Lady Gaga, Larry King, Maya Angelou, Steve Wozniak, Jane Goodall, Jessica Alba, Quincy Jones, and more.


Alex has been named on Forbes’ 30 Under 30 list, Business Insider’s Most Powerful People Under 30, and has been featured in major media, including The Washington Post, Fortune, CNBC, MSNBC, Fox News, and NBC News. Alex is an acclaimed keynote speaker, and has presented the Third Door framework to business conferences and corporate leadership teams around the world, including Apple, Google, Nike, IBM, Snapchat, Salesforce, and Disney.


In this episode, Dhru and Alex talk about the seven year mission he undertook to unlock the secret to immense success from some of the most successful people in the world. They discuss the importance of mindset and that when you change what you believe is possible, you change what becomes possible. They talk about how to stay resilient in the face of rejection, and how our growth comes from our mistakes. They also talk about the importance of cultivating meaningful relationships, and the impact it has on our health and mindset when working to accomplish a goal.


In this episode, we dive into:


-The analogy of what the Third Door is (4:28)

-Alex’s personal journey (7:01)

-The difference between fearlessness and courage (33:30)

-How to figure out what you want to do in life (41:11)

-Alex’s 30-Day Challenge to uncover your path (42:37)

-The importance of having an inside man to support you on your journey (54:11)

-How to cultivate meaningful friendships (1:10:42)

-Alex’s advice for difficult conversations (1:15:08)

-How to overcome failure (1:24:52)

-Learn more about Alex and his work (1:34:09)


For more on Alex, be sure to follow him on Instagram @alexbanayan, on Facebook @alexbanayan, and on Twitter @alexbanayan. Check out his website http://thirddoorbook.com. You can find his book, The Third Door: The Wild Quest to Uncover How the World's Most Successful People Launched Their Careers, right here.

2019-8-1

#66: How to Break Through Sadness, Shame, Anger, Embarrassment and Other Difficult Emotions with Dr. Joan Rosenberg

Season 1, Ep. 66

What often blocks most people from success and feeling capable in life is the ability to experience, move through, and handle unpleasant feelings, such as sadness, shame, helplessness, anger, embarrassment, disappointment, frustration, and vulnerability. 


Knowing how to deal with intense, overwhelming, or uncomfortable feelings is essential to building confidence, emotional strength, and resilience. Yet when we distract or disconnect from these feelings, we move away from confidence, health, and our desired pursuits, ultimately undermining our ability to fully realize our ambitions.


On today’s Broken Brain Podcast, our host, Dhru, talks to Dr. Joan Rosenberg, a psychologist who is known as an innovative thinker, acclaimed speaker, and trainer. She is a professor of graduate psychology at Pepperdine University in Los Angeles, CA, and is a two-time TEDx speaker and member of the Association of Transformational Leaders. Dr. Rosenberg has been featured in the documentary I Am, The Miracle Mindset, Pursuing Happiness, and The Hidden Epidemic. She’s been seen on CNN’s American Morning, the OWN network, and PBS, as well as appearances and radio interviews in all of the major metropolitan markets. Her latest book, 90 Seconds to a Life You Love: How to Master Your Difficult Feelings to Cultivate Lasting Confidence, Resilience and Authenticity, was released this past February. 


In this episode, Dhru and Dr. Rosenberg talk about how to work through unpleasant feelings, and how to build emotional strength to create the life of your dreams. They discuss why worrying about what other people think of you is really just a distraction from feeling vulnerable, and why harsh self-criticism is one of the most destructive things we can do to ourselves. They also talk about why speaking your truth is the most important action to take to cultivate confidence, authenticity, and resilience. 


In this episode, we dive into:


-How our emotions are tied to our success (1:59)

-Why it’s so difficult for us to experience unpleasant feelings (11:59)

-Why labeling our feelings is so important (16:54)

-How to build confidence (25:25)

-How to stay present to your feelings through The Rosenberg Reset Formula (31:28)

-What is really underneath fear and anxiety (38:08)

-How to release painful memories and old stories (44:22)

-The importance of speaking your truth to build confidence (52:32)

-Why compliments are so difficult to receive (1:04:50)

-Finding your purpose (1:08:03)

-How to be resilient in the face of change (1:12:23)

-Learn more about Dr. Rosenberg and her work (1:16:22)


For more on Dr. Joan Rosenberg, be sure to follow her on Instagram @drjoanrosenberg, on Facebook @drjrosenberg, and on Twitter @drjoanrosenberg. Check out her website https://drjoanrosenberg.com. You can find her book, 90 Seconds to a Life You Love: How to Master Your Difficult Feelings to Cultivate Lasting Confidence, Resilience and Authenticity, right here. Lastly, here is a bonus gift from Dr. Rosenberg: https://drjoanrosenberg.com/gift.

2019-7-25

#65: How to Fix your Gut Health Using Innovative Testing, Exercise, and Compassion with Dr. Marvin Singh

Season 1, Ep. 65

In Functional Medicine, we put a heavy emphasis on gut health. We know that a strong gut is not just essential for digesting food and absorbing nutrients, but that it plays a vital role in the immune system and affects the health of the entire body. 


On today’s Broken Brain Podcast, our host, Dhru, talks to Dr. Marvin Singh, an integrative gastroenterologist. Dr. Singh graduated from the Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, and completed his residency training in internal medicine at the University of Michigan Health System, followed by a fellowship training in Gastroenterology at Scripps Clinic and Green Hospital. Dr. Singh was also trained by Dr. Andrew Weil, a pioneer in the field of integrative medicine, at the University of Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine. Dr. Singh uses cutting-edge tests and personally designed protocols to develop a truly individualized plan for his patients based on their genetics, microbiome, metabolism, and lifestyle.


In this episode, Dhru and Dr. Singh talk about the cutting edge research of DNA methylation PhenoAge, which can predict things like aging, inflammation, and heart disease. They discuss how changes in the gut microbiome can impact gene expression, how our microbiome influences the dietary choices we make, and how our gut health can have a significant effect on healthy aging. They also talk about the implications of diet and the gut microbiome in neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative disease. 


In this episode, we dive into:


-How DNA methylation can predict age and age-related outcomes (2:24)

-How our gut microbiome influences our food choices (9:35)

-The gut-brain connection (13:22)

-The gut microbiome and neurodegenerative diseases (17:35)

-Dr. Singh’s personal health journey (21:51)

-Why personalization is so important when it comes to our gut health (43:29)

-Food sensitivity testing (46:56)

-Gut microbiome testing (54:05)

-Probiotics (59:49)

-How exercise impacts our gut health (1:07:12)

-Prebiotics (1:09:59)

-Digestive enzymes (1:13:05)

-Fecal transplants (1:20:33)

-Colon hydrotherapy (1:26:39)

-How social connections impact our health (1:32:19)

-Learn more about Dr. Singh and his work (1:38:16)


For more on Dr. Marvin Singh, be sure to follow him on Instagram @DrMarvinSingh, on Facebook @DrMarvinSingh, and on Twitter @DrMarvinSingh. Check out his website https://drmarvinsingh.com, and download his FREE 4 Week Gut Reset e-book, right here. Dr. Singh was also featured in the Interconnected Docu-series which you can watch here


If you’re looking to work with an integrative practitioner you can search for one here:

-The Institute for Functional Medicine: https://www.ifm.org/find-a-practitioner/ 

-The Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine: https://integrativemedicine.arizona.edu/alumni.html


Lastly, check out the article Dhru referenced during the interview from Anahad O’Connor: Is There an Optimal Diet for Humans?


2019-7-18

#64: A Radical Approach to Treating the Root Cause of Stress, Pain, and Addiction with Dr. David Haase

Season 1, Ep. 64

When it comes to addiction, Functional Medicine can offer a comprehensive approach to treating the whole person. 


Mind, body, and spirit need to be taken into account, as well as diet and lifestyle interventions and the ever-so-essential aspect of a supportive and uplifting community. With a systems-based approach, we can cover all of these areas and more, to create long-term recovery.


On today’s Broken Brain Podcast, our host, Dhru, talks to Dr. David Haase, a leading educator and innovator in the emerging field of personalized systems medicine. He graduated from Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and completed his medical residency at the Mayo Clinic where, despite the undeniable brilliance and dedication of the doctors around him, he saw countless instances of patients getting better not because of medical advances, but in spite of them.


After years of turbulent reflection, Dr. Haase founded the MaxWell Clinic in Tennessee with the expressed goal to better understand and enable the human body’s miraculous ability to create health. He treats a wide range of conditions and has a special expertise in neurodegenerative and other brain-related challenges, fatigue, and other conditions caused by mitochondrial, inflammatory, and immune dysregulation. Dr. Haase also teaches internationally, including for the Institute for Functional Medicine.


In this episode, Dhru and Dr. Haase talk about how Functional Medicine is a great way to address complex chronic conditions like substance use disorders. They discuss how early life trauma impacts brain development and increases the likelihood of stress, pain and addiction. They also talk about how we can use Functional Medicine to transition from acute care to long-term sustainable recovery.


In this episode, we dive into:


-The connection between stress, pain, and addiction (13:15)

-How opioids affects the gut-brain interaction (19:07)

-Addiction as a chronic disease (22:44)

-How early life trauma impacts brain development (28:19)

-How nutritional deficiencies impact stress, pain, and addiction (35:18)

-Environmental toxins and the susceptibility to stress, pain, and addiction (42:02)

-The importance of community when it comes to our health (51:46)

-Dr. David Haase’s story of how he got into systems-based medicine (57:26)

-How a Functional Medicine doctor can play an important role to support someone in their recovery (1:08:08)

-Learn more about Dr. Haase and his work (1:13:49)


For more on Dr. David Haase, be sure to follow him on Instagram @davidhaasemd, on Facebook @davidhaasemd, and on Twitter @davidhaasemd. Check out his website https://drhaase.com. You can find his book, Curiosity Heals the Human: How to Solve “Unsolvable” Medical Challenges with Better Questions and Advanced Technologies, right here.

2019-7-11

#63: Putting out the Fires of Addiction with Dr. John Kelly

Season 1, Ep. 63

Drug overdose and opioid-related deaths continue to grow at an alarming rate in the United States. According to the CDC, more than 700,000 people died from drug overdoses between 1999 and 2017, and on average, 130 Americans die from an opioid overdose every day. 


On today’s Broken Brain Podcast, our host, Dhru, talks to Dr. John Kelly, Professor of Psychiatry in Addiction Medicine at Harvard Medical School, Founder and Director of the Recovery Research Institute at the Massachusetts General Hospital, Program Director of the Addiction Recovery Management Service, and Associate Director of the Center for Addiction Medicine at MGH. He has served as a consultant to U.S. federal agencies and non-federal institutions and foreign governments. His clinical and research work has focused on enhancing the effectiveness of addiction treatment and recovery support services, stigma reduction, and addiction and criminal justice. 


In this episode, Dhru and Dr. Kelly talk about the current approach to addressing addiction in our country, and the power of language when it comes to destigmatizing addiction. They discuss how the opioid crisis became a self-manufactured epidemic and the importance of building an effective public health infrastructure to combat the opioid crisis and other substance use disorders. They also talk about the best way to support a loved one with an addiction, and the importance of social connections for long-term recovery. 


In this episode, we dive into:


-Changing the language around addiction (13:39)

-The current model of treating addiction: admit, treat, discharge (23:56)

-The National Recovery Study (26:40)

-Pathways to recovery (33:31)

-The social factors into and out of addiction (36:16)

-Preventative approaches to substance use disorder (41:01)

-The opioid crisis (45:27)

-Mindfulness-based interventions for recovery (51:08)

-Safe injection sites (57:38)

-Resources for family members (1:01:08)

-The power of AA for long-term recovery and reducing health care costs (1:04:53)

-Learn more about Dr. Kelly and his work (1:16:44)


For more on Dr. John Kelly, be sure to follow him on Facebook @RecoveryAnswers and on Twitter @RecoveryAnswers. Check out his website and sign up for his monthly newsletter at https://www.recoveryanswers.org.

2019-7-4

#62: The Secret to Better Sleep? Stop Doing This One Thing with Dr. Mark Burhenne

Season 1, Ep. 62

How many times have you chalked up weight gain, brain fog, and feeling tired to getting older? The many symptoms we assume to be a natural part of the aging process are far too often related to one single pillar of health: sleep. In fact, 22 million Americans suffer from sleep apnea, yet most people who have it never get diagnosed.  


On today’s Broken Brain Podcast, our host, Dhru, talks to Dr. Mark Burhenne, a practicing sleep medicine dentist in Sunnyvale, California. He received his degree from the Dugoni School of Dentistry in San Francisco and is a member of the American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine, Academy of General Dentistry, American Academy for Oral Systemic Health, and the Dental Board of California. Dr. Burhenne is passionate about helping people understand the connection between oral and overall health. He spends a lot of time educating patients and readers about the importance of healthy sleep, and is the author of the #1 bestseller, The 8-Hour Sleep Paradox. 


In this episode, Dhru and Dr. Burhenne dive deep into the topic of sleep apnea and upper airway resistance syndrome (UARS). They discuss who is at risk for sleep apnea, how to identify the underlying cause, and the long-term health risks associated with sleep apnea. They talk about the difference between mouth breathing and nose breathing, and how mouth breathing reduces the quality of your sleep, disrupts the balance of your oral microbiome, and makes your more prone to tooth decay. They also get into the benefits of mouth taping for improved sleep and overall health. 


In this episode, we dive into:


-The connection between oral health and systemic health (5:55)

-The risk factors for sleep apnea (9:24)

-Sleep apnea and brain health (18:15)

-The connection between mood disorders, TMJ, and sleep apnea (20:42)

-How sleep apnea can cause anxiety (21:55)

-Mouth breathing vs. nose breathing (25:19)

-How mouth taping can improve sleep and overall health (30:32)

-Why mouth breathing is the #1 cause of cavities (40:52)

-The connection between gum disease and autoimmune conditions (1:04:21)

-Why we should avoid fluoride (1:10:10)

-Dr. Burhenne’s toothpaste recommendations (1:17:05)

-Mouthwash and the root cause of bad breath (1:18:42)

-Dr. Burhenne’s three step plan for improving sleep and overall health (1:23:11) 

-Learn more about Dr. Burhenne and his work (1:42:23)


For more on Dr. Mark Burhenne, be sure to follow him on Instagram @askthedentist and on Facebook @askthedentist. Check out his website https://askthedentist.com and https://www.drburhenne.com. You can find his book, The 8-Hour Sleep Paradox, right here.