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Work and Life with Stew Friedman

Welcome to the Work and Life Podcast with Stew Friedman -- bestselling author, celebrated professor at The Wharton School, and founder of Wharton's Work/Life Integration Project. Stew is widely recognized as the world's ... More
Latest Episode
2019-9-11

Ep 139. Lex Washington and Pam Carlton: Black Professional Women at Work

Alexis Smith and Pamela Carlton are co-authors of a research project called Making the Invisible Visible. Alexis Smith is an Associate Professor of Management at the Spears School of Business at Oklahoma State University. Her research areas span workplace issues such as gender and diversity, as well as bias and discrimination.  In 2003 Pamela Carlton retired as a Managing Director and Associate Director of US Equity Research at JPMorgan Chase. She is a corporate attorney with degrees from Williams College, Yale Law School, and the Yale School of Management. Pam is President of Springboard—Partners in Cross Cultural Leadership, an organizational consulting firm that assesses organizations for an inclusive culture, designs interventions, and provides independent advisory services. Springboard produced the groundbreaking report Black Women Executives Research Initiative. Pam co-founded the Everest Project, a research initiative focused on leading change and innovation that produced The Eve of Change: Women Redefining Corporate America.  


Stew spoke with both Lex and Pam about the dual challenges black women face in the workplace, being members of two minority groups who have been traditionally undervalued, underpaid, and invisible. Their research on successful black women executives highlights the ways these unusually resilient people, who were able to defy the odds and attain a pinnacle of achievement, have lessons about careers and life from which all can learn.  Mentors are essential as is support from family and community. Their uplifting conclusions point to the importance of seeing all experiences -- large and small, positive and negative -- as opportunities to demonstrate competence and excellence to others, and to ourselves. 


2019-9-11

Ep 139. Lex Washington and Pam Carlton: Black Professional Women at Work

Alexis Smith and Pamela Carlton are co-authors of a research project called Making the Invisible Visible. Alexis Smith is an Associate Professor of Management at the Spears School of Business at Oklahoma State University. Her research areas span workplace issues such as gender and diversity, as well as bias and discrimination.  In 2003 Pamela Carlton retired as a Managing Director and Associate Director of US Equity Research at JPMorgan Chase. She is a corporate attorney with degrees from Williams College, Yale Law School, and the Yale School of Management. Pam is President of Springboard—Partners in Cross Cultural Leadership, an organizational consulting firm that assesses organizations for an inclusive culture, designs interventions, and provides independent advisory services. Springboard produced the groundbreaking report Black Women Executives Research Initiative. Pam co-founded the Everest Project, a research initiative focused on leading change and innovation that produced The Eve of Change: Women Redefining Corporate America.  


Stew spoke with both Lex and Pam about the dual challenges black women face in the workplace, being members of two minority groups who have been traditionally undervalued, underpaid, and invisible. Their research on successful black women executives highlights the ways these unusually resilient people, who were able to defy the odds and attain a pinnacle of achievement, have lessons about careers and life from which all can learn.  Mentors are essential as is support from family and community. Their uplifting conclusions point to the importance of seeing all experiences -- large and small, positive and negative -- as opportunities to demonstrate competence and excellence to others, and to ourselves. 


2019-9-4

Ep 138. Andrew Stern: The Best Work of Your Life

Andrew Stern co-leads the Learning & Development team at Squarespace in New York City. Prior to joining Squarespace in June 2018, Andrew held several roles on Bloomberg's Talent Development team and worked as a human capital consultant at Deloitte. He serves on the advisory boards of Own The Room and GenHERation. Andrew graduated cum laude from The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania with a concentration in Organizational Effectiveness. He is an officer of the Wharton Alumni Club of New York.


In this episode, Stew and Andrew (who was Stew’s student at Wharton) discuss what millennials want from their employers and how Squarespace is responding with cool programs and practices that attract and retain millennial talent. Andrew describes benefits that go beyond what he calls “world-class health care insurance,” such as the organization’s commitment to providing each employee with two fully comped websites they can use for their own outside businesses or other interests. Andrew talks about the purpose and value of affinity groups, including one that isn’t just supportive of “dog-friendly” policies but also supports Halloween dress-ups for dogs. Andrew explains that Squarespace aspires to be an employer that enables all of their employees to do the best work of their lives and where employees are hired to push the boundaries of what’s possible in their respective domains.

2019-8-28

Ep 137. Eric Orts: Why Businesses Must Care for the Natural Environment

Eric Orts is the Guardsmark Professor at the Wharton School.  He’s a Professor of Legal Studies and Business Ethics with a secondary appointment in Management. He’s also Faculty Director of the Initiative for Global Environmental Leadership. Eric’s current research includes a forthcoming article on Senate Democracy: Our Lockean Paradox and How to Solve It in the American University Law Review and a another, co-authored with Amy Sepinwall, on Collective Rights and the Court in the Washington University Law Review.  He’s completing a book for Oxford University Press on Rethinking the Firm, an interdisciplinary sequel to his Business Persons:  A Legal Theory of the Firm.  And he has ongoing research projects on financial regulation and economic inequality and theories of democracy and the business firm.  He’s also the author of The Moral Responsibility of Firms.

In this episode, Stew and Eric discuss the real and present danger of climate change and the reality that we currently have the technological solutions to address this issue, but lack the political will to do so. They discuss the importance of corporations taking their responsibility in this arena seriously, not only to help save our planet, but also because it makes financial sense for them to do so, and the implications of this set of challenges for business education -- how we empower then rising generation of leaders.  Eric offers hard-won wisdom on how to find hope to inspire positive action when it might feel like an overwhelming task to try to save the world for our children, their children, and the generations to come.  


2019-8-21

Ep 136. Madonna Harrington Meyer: Intensive Grandparenting

Madonna Harrington Meyer is a professor of sociology and Laura J. and L. Douglas Meredith Professor of Teaching Excellence at the Maxwell School of Public Affairs at Syracuse University. She is a senior research associate at the Center for Policy Research and faculty affiliate at the Aging Studies Institute at Syracuse University. Madonna is the author of the 2014 book Grandmothers at Work: Juggling Families and Jobs, winner of the Gerontological Society of America’s Kalish Book Award. And she’s the co-editor of Grandparenting in the United States (2016) and of Market Friendly or Family Friendly? The State and Gender Inequality in Old Age (2007), which also won the Gerontological Society of America’s Kalish Book Award. She has published over 50 scholarly articles in leading journals and her research has been reported in the New York Times, Boston Globe, and other leading periodicals. In 2016 she was named winner of the American Sociological Association (ASA) Section on Aging and the Life Course (SALC) Matilda White Riley Distinguished Scholar Award. 


In this episode, Stew and Madonna discuss the indescribable joys of grandparenting as well as some of the new underbelly for grandparents who provide care for their grandchildren. In her research, Madonna has found that what sociologists call “the intensification of motherhood” has now seeped into grandmotherhood as well. Increasingly, grandparents are not just having fun with their grandchildren, they’re also taking them to doctor’s appointments, dropping them off and picking them up at school, supervising nightly homework and baths, and much more. In short, grandparents are taking on tasks that have, until recently, generally been the purview of parents.  So, in addition to the sublime pleasures of grandparenting, many grandparents are now also feeling high levels of stress and strain as grandparenting intensifies. This is especially true for grandparents who are also working outside the home.  


2019-8-14

135. Emily Oster: An Economist's Parenting Wisdom

Emily Oster is Professor of Economics at Brown University and a mom of two. She has written two parent's guides to the chaos and frequent misinformation that often occurs in the early years of parenthood. She addresses, and often debunks, myths on breast feeding, sleep training, language acquisition, and more. In both her books --  Cribsheet: A Data-Driven Guide to Better, More Relaxed Parenting, from Birth to Preschool and Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom is Wrong and What You Really Need to Know -- she aims to create a world of more relaxed pregnant women and parents.  She holds a Ph.D. in Economics from Harvard University.


In this episode, Stew and Emily discuss the state of the research on parenting and how much of can result in one-size-fits-all recommendations that may not be accurate or useful for individual children, parents, and families.  In describing the source of inspiration for her books on parenting, Emily explains her journey from her first pregnancy through her current situation, raising two children, and how the medical recommendations she received were not as helpful as she’d hoped. Using the skills and methods from her training as an economist, she assessed the state of the literature to help herself and others. With the exception of vaccinations -- where the research is crystal clear that they are a good idea -- she found that for most other parenting decisions the answer is essentially “it depends.” So do what’s right for you and your family but learn to ask the right questions, which is what her books help you to do. In today’s high-pressure environment, her reasoned, evidence-based approach is a balm for young families and those who care about them.


2019-8-7

Ep 134. Kimberly Ramalho: Building a Culture of Empathy

Kimberly Ramalho is Vice President of Communications and Public Affairs, Rotary and Mission Systems, at Lockheed Martin. She is a strategic communications executive with 25 years of experience developing programs that deliver high return on investment, motivate employees, and increase business awareness and demand. Kimberly is actively involved in diversity and inclusion initiatives at Lockheed Martin, and she serves as executive chair of the corporation’s Women’s Impact Network.  She was honored with the 2019 Alice Paul Equality Award for Empowerment.

 

In this episode, Stew and Kimberly discuss the importance of valuing and respecting everyone in the organization, how to make such empathy real, and the benefits that a diverse workforce brings directly to the company and to customers.  Kimberly describes the ways that Lockheed Martin is taking a systematic, proactive approach to helping all employees understand the perspective of others through training and highly engaged support from CEO Marilyn Hewson.  

2019-7-31

Ep 133. Josh Davis: Two Awesome Hours

Josh Davis received his bachelor’s from Brown University and his doctorate from Columbia University. He is the director of research for the NeuroLeadership Institute (NLI), a global institute dedicated to synthesizing scientific research and guiding its use in the business and leadership fields. Josh produced a wonderful book in which he shares this wisdom: Two Awesome Hours: Science-Based Strategies to Harness Your Best Time and Get Your Most Important Work Done.  


Josh talks with Stew about strategies for creating the best conditions for two hours of extraordinary productivity each and every day in order to avoid feeling overwhelmed and, instead, to be more efficient, effective, and productive, with more of your attention available for the non-work sides of life.  Among the useful strategies Stew and Josh discuss are stepping back to see the whole picture of a situation before acting and the power of daydreaming to increase creativity.