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Good Shepherd Barrhaven Sermon Stream

Weekly Sermons from Good Shepherd, Barrhaven

We're a Christian church located in the suburbs of Ottawa, where it can be hard to feel connected to God, to each other, and to the places we live and work in. These sermons tell the story of how Jesus helps us live out ... More
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2019-7-21

Slacking for Jesus

Season 2019, Ep. 27

We live in a distracted age. There is always something more to do. For many of us, life can seem like an endless set of tasks. Sometimes, we get disappointed with Jesus because we don't think he's giving us enough help in getting the tasks done. Yet, the bible makes it clear that this isn't what Jesus came to do. Jesus invites us to follow his priorities, rather than inviting his help to fulfill our priorities. In today's sermon, Fr. Stephen reflects on the story of Mary & Martha from the Gospel of Luke. These two sisters are examples of the right way to set priorities and the wrong way to set them. They provide a good challenge for us to look to Jesus to put our priorities right.


Scripture Reference: Luke 10:38-42

Preached on the Sixth Sunday after Pentecost, July 21, 2019 by Rev. Stephen Silverthorne


Sermon Highlights

  • This story is the second half of Jesus' answer to the question asked last week
  • Good Samaritan showed us what loving neighbour looks like
  • This story shows us what love of God looks like
  • Not a story about clergy being better than others
  • A story about making time in life to ask Jesus what is important
  • A story about responding to this even when it means setting aside things we value


Further Reading/Viewing

Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead by Tom Stoppard. A play and movie about two minor characters caught up in a bigger story

Hamlet by William Shakespeare. A famous play about a Danish prince obsessed with his father's death.

2019-7-21

Slacking for Jesus

Season 2019, Ep. 27

We live in a distracted age. There is always something more to do. For many of us, life can seem like an endless set of tasks. Sometimes, we get disappointed with Jesus because we don't think he's giving us enough help in getting the tasks done. Yet, the bible makes it clear that this isn't what Jesus came to do. Jesus invites us to follow his priorities, rather than inviting his help to fulfill our priorities. In today's sermon, Fr. Stephen reflects on the story of Mary & Martha from the Gospel of Luke. These two sisters are examples of the right way to set priorities and the wrong way to set them. They provide a good challenge for us to look to Jesus to put our priorities right.


Scripture Reference: Luke 10:38-42

Preached on the Sixth Sunday after Pentecost, July 21, 2019 by Rev. Stephen Silverthorne


Sermon Highlights

  • This story is the second half of Jesus' answer to the question asked last week
  • Good Samaritan showed us what loving neighbour looks like
  • This story shows us what love of God looks like
  • Not a story about clergy being better than others
  • A story about making time in life to ask Jesus what is important
  • A story about responding to this even when it means setting aside things we value


Further Reading/Viewing

Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead by Tom Stoppard. A play and movie about two minor characters caught up in a bigger story

Hamlet by William Shakespeare. A famous play about a Danish prince obsessed with his father's death.

2019-7-7

Won't You Be My Neighbour?

Season 2019, Ep. 26

We are all scared of evangelism. Few people seem to enjoy sharing their faith, even though Jesus tells us it's a priority for his disciples to do so. So how can we overcome our fear? What does it look like to share our faith? How can we avoid the cliches and manipulation that the word sometimes brings with it? In this sermon, Fr. Stephen shares how faith-sharing really boils down to being a good neighbour and loving as Jesus does. The specifics of our faith can start shining through only when we have shown genuine love for those we live with and next to.


Scripture reference: Luke 10:1-20

Preached by Rev. Stephen Silverthorne on the 4th Sunday after Pentecost, July 7, 2019


Sermon Highlights

  • Sharing faith scares us
  • Jesus expects us to do it
  • We share faith effectively when we live out our faith
  • We show who Jesus is by loving our neighbours
  • This practical love is the only thing which will break through people's cynicism
  • God does the real work in preparing the harvest
  • We are not responsible for bringing people to Jesus
  • We are only responsible for loving them like Jesus does
  • We will fail to connect with some people
  • We can't let it bother us
  • Handling rejection is easier when you know God loves you


Further Reading

The Art of Neighboring by Jay Pathak & Dave Runyon.  Through compelling true stories of lives impacted, the authors show readers how to create genuine friendships with the people who live in closest proximity to them

2019-6-30

A Transforming Fire

Season 2019, Ep. 25

We all long for vengeance sometimes. The desire to crush our enemies, and make them suffer for what they have done for us, is hard to overcome. Here, Jesus' disciples indulge in this desire to crush their enemies, but Jesus shows them a better way. The fire of the Holy Spirit comes to transform our enemies, not to crush them. This sermon encourages us to look for the redemption of those caught up in evil, and challenges us to be instruments of that transformation.


Scripture references: 2 Kings 1:1-18; Luke 9:51-62

Preached on the 3rd Sunday after Pentecost, June 30th, by the Rev. Stephen Silverthorne


Sermon Highlights

  • Vengeance is a natural desire
  • Vengeance rarely solves anything
  • Jesus is rejected by Samaritans
  • Disciples want to follow Elijah's example and burn up enemies
  • Jesus rebukes them
  • Jesus instead points them to work for Samaria's redemption
  • Fire of Pentecost doesn't destroy but transforms
  • We are called to work for transformation of enemies
  • This is difficult work which costs us a lot
  • It is worth doing because Jesus' way is our highest calling


Further Reading

Vengeance by George Jonas. Tells the story of Israel's spy agency tracking down and punishing those responsible for the murder of Israeli athletes at the Olympics in 1972


Making Friends of Trolls by Caitrin Keiper. The story of how a nasty internet comment led to an angry hateful man being transformed into a more decent human being.

2019-6-13

Pentecost

Season 2019, Ep. 24

Pentecost is one of the most important festivals in the church year. Yet, the meaning of this important festival is sometimes lost on us. In this sermon, Fr. Stephen shows how Pentecost reveals that God's promises are trustworthy even when their fulfillment takes longer than we hope. It also shows us that God empowers us to do tasks we couldn't do on our own.


Scripture reference: Acts 2:1-21

Preached by the Rev. Stephen Silverthorne on June 9, 2019, Pentecost Sunday

Sermon Highlights

  • Pentecost shows us we are wrapped up in God's bigger plans
  • The Spirit's coming is the fulfillment of a promise from God made centuries before
  • God's promise was fulfilled in God's time-frame, not ours
  • This encourages us to trust in God's promises
  • This challenges us to accept God's timing is different than ours
  • Pentecost shows us God can empower people to do what they can't normally do
  • We have been given difficult tasks by God
  • We can do them if we open ourselves to God's Spirit
2019-6-2

A Happy Absence

Season 2019, Ep. 23

Ascension is a principal feast in the Anglican Church, celebrating Jesus' ascension into heaven. However, this can seem like an odd thing to celebrate. Why be happy at Jesus' absence? This sermon explores why Jesus' ascension is important, even if it causes real challenges for us.


Scripture reference: Acts 1:1-11; Luke 24:44-53

Preached by Rev. Stephen Silverthorne on the Sunday after Ascension, June 2, 2019


Sermon Highlights

  • Jesus' ascension is ascension into God's glory
  • Symbolism of cloud, angels points to God's presence
  • Jesus' absence makes our doubts understandable
  • Jesus' absence puts responsibility on us as witnesses
  • Jesus gives the church to help shape us into good witnesses
  • Jesus gives the Spirit to empower us to put witness into action
2019-5-26

Flawless

Season 2019, Ep. 22

Pictures of heaven can sometimes seem boring and cliche. Yet, we get many pictures in the Bible, especially in the Book of Revelation. So why are they important, and how do they speak to us today? In this sermon, Fr. Stephen addresses the picture of the New Jerusalem which appears in the last chapters of Revelation. This picture of a perfect city is a sign of hope for the imperfect people who follow Jesus because it shows God can make very flawed people and things right.


Scripture Reference: Revelation 21:9-22:5

Preached on the 6th Sunday of Easter, May 26 by Rev. Stephen Silverthorne


Sermon Highlights

  • Revelation written after the destruction of Jerusalem
  • This failed city appeared dead and broken
  • God shows a vision of it renewed and perfected
  • We see our flaws and grow discouraged
  • God can perfect us like He will perfect Jerusalem
  • God challenges us with a vision of peace
  • How can we allow God to use us as instruments of peace?


Further Reading