Share

Physiology and Behavior

With Dan Quintana

Dan Quintana is a scientist trying to better understand how our physiology influences behaviour. On this show you'll find a mix of episodes on research that's catching Dan's eye in biological psychology, interviews with ... More
Latest Episode
2019-4-22

A pre-registered study on the causal link between intranasal oxytocin and spiritual experiences | Study summary

A 2018 study that provides mixed support for a causal link between single dose intranasal oxytocin and spiritual experiences 


-----

Dan on Twitter and Instagram

2019-4-22

A pre-registered study on the causal link between intranasal oxytocin and spiritual experiences | Study summary

A 2018 study that provides mixed support for a causal link between single dose intranasal oxytocin and spiritual experiences 


-----

Dan on Twitter and Instagram

2019-4-19

Oxytocin-like receptor distributions in birds | Study summary

A new study provides oxytocin-like receptor distribution maps for the brains of three birds species


-----

Dan on Twitter and Instagram

2019-4-18

Oxytocin blocks enhanced motivation for alcohol in alcohol dependent rats | Study summary

A new study suggests that oxytocin blocks enhanced motivation for alcohol in alcohol dependent rats



-----

Dan on Twitter and Instagram

2019-4-17

Oxytocin does not influence social decision making in Capuchin monkeys | Study summary

A new study suggests that oxytocin does not influence social decision making in Capuchin monkeys


-----

Dan on Twitter and Instagram

2019-4-16

Systemic oxytocin administration alters mesolimbic dopamine release in mice | Study summary

A new study suggests that systemic oxytocin administration alters mesolimbic dopamine release in mice


-----

Dan on Twitter and Instagram

2019-4-15

Intranasal oxytocin decreases task-related aggressive responses in young males | Study summary

A new study suggests that intranasal oxytocin decreases task-related aggressive responses in young males 


-----

Dan on Twitter and Instagram

2019-4-12

Oxytocin increases male-directed threats and vocalizations in female macaques | Study summary

A new study suggests that oxytocin increases male-directed threats and vocalizations in female macaques


-----

Dan on Twitter and Instagram