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Ipse Dixit

A Podcast on Legal Scholarship

Ipse Dixit is a podcast on legal scholarship. Each episode of Ipse Dixit features a different guest discussing their scholarship. The podcast also features several special series."From the Archives" consists historical r... More
Latest Episode
2019-11-13

Josh Shepperd on the Preservation of Radio History

Season 1, Ep. 419

In this episode, Josh Shepperd, Assistant Professor of Media Studies at the Catholic University of America, Sound Fellow at the Library of Congress National Recording Preservation Board (NRPB), and Humanities and Information Fellow at Penn State, discusses his work on the history of radio broadcasting and the preservation of sound recordings. Shepperd begins by explaining the purpose of the NRPB and the Radio Preservation Task Force. He describes the perilous state of the archival record of American radio, reflecting on why so many recordings are lost or destroyed, and how many recording are rapidly deteriorating. He argues that radio recordings preserve a unique aspect of American cultural history, distinct from any other, and focused on the lived experience of marginalized groups. He also discusses his forthcoming history of public broadcasting, and the little-known story of how Theodor Adorno came to the United States to advise the government on educational radio policy. Shepperd is on Twitter at @joshshepperd.

This episode was hosted by Brian L. Frye, Spears-Gilbert Associate Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law. Frye is on Twitter at @brianlfrye.

2019-11-13

Josh Shepperd on the Preservation of Radio History

Season 1, Ep. 419

In this episode, Josh Shepperd, Assistant Professor of Media Studies at the Catholic University of America, Sound Fellow at the Library of Congress National Recording Preservation Board (NRPB), and Humanities and Information Fellow at Penn State, discusses his work on the history of radio broadcasting and the preservation of sound recordings. Shepperd begins by explaining the purpose of the NRPB and the Radio Preservation Task Force. He describes the perilous state of the archival record of American radio, reflecting on why so many recordings are lost or destroyed, and how many recording are rapidly deteriorating. He argues that radio recordings preserve a unique aspect of American cultural history, distinct from any other, and focused on the lived experience of marginalized groups. He also discusses his forthcoming history of public broadcasting, and the little-known story of how Theodor Adorno came to the United States to advise the government on educational radio policy. Shepperd is on Twitter at @joshshepperd.

This episode was hosted by Brian L. Frye, Spears-Gilbert Associate Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law. Frye is on Twitter at @brianlfrye.

2019-11-11

Thom Chu on Estate Planning

Season 1, Ep. 417

In this episode, Thomas K. Chu, a New York attorney, discusses his work on estate planning and issues affecting older clients. Chu begins by describing his background and legal practice. He reflects on common misconceptions about estate planning and common mistakes people make when planning their estates. In particular, he argues that everyone should have an estate plan, even if they have limited assets, because estate planning is not only about financial assets, but also about life choices, especially decisions about disability and end of life choices. He closes by reflecting on the relationship of his work in the charitable sector and his faith to his work as an attorney. Chu is on Twitter at @ThomChu.

This episode was hosted by Brian L. Frye, Spears-Gilbert Associate Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law. Frye is on Twitter at @brianlfrye.

2019-11-9

Alexandra Roberts on Regulating Influencers

Season 1, Ep. 416

In this episode, Alexandra J. Roberts, Associate Professor of Law at the University of New Hampshire Franklin Pierce School of Law, discusses her draft article "False Influencing." Roberts begins by explaining what an "influencer" is, what influencer advertising looks like, and why influencer ads are so popular with many different brands. She observes that many influencer ads are not transparent about sponsorship, and some make false or misleading claims about products or the influencers personal experience with products. She explains how the FTC has attempted to regulate influencer ads, especially by requiring disclosure of sponsorship, but notes that many influencers do not comply with those regulations. She notes that brands can also regulate their competitors's ads themselves, and reflects on why they don't. She closes by reflecting on how consumers understand influencer ads and how influencers understand their own brands. Roberts is on Twitter at @lexlanham.

This episode was hosted by Brian L. Frye, Spears-Gilbert Associate Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law. Frye is on Twitter at @brianlfrye.

2019-11-9

Ryan Vacca on the Legal Definition of an Employee

Season 1, Ep. 415

In this episode, Ryan Vacca, Professor of Law at the University of New Hampshire Franklin Pierce School of Law, discusses his article "Uncertainty in Employee Status Across Federal Law," which will be published in the Temple Law Review. Vacca begin by explaining the origins of the distinction between employees and independent contractors, and why it was created. He discusses the historical development of the distinction, observing courts initially interpreted federal statutes regulating employment in light of the purpose of the statute, but Congress amended the statutes to require a "common law" interpretation of employee status, weighing many different factors. He discusses his empirical study of how courts have applied the common law test in many different contexts, and reflects on what it can tell us about the policy questions at issue. Vacca is on Twitter at @RyanVacca.

This episode was hosted by Brian L. Frye, Spears-Gilbert Associate Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law. Frye is on Twitter at @brianlfrye.

2019-11-8

Catherine Christopher on Normalizing Struggle

Season 1, Ep. 413

In this episode, Catherine Christopher, Associate Dean for Bar Success and Professor of Law at the Texas Tech University School of Law, discusses her article "Normalizing Struggle." Christopher explains why “struggle” is not only a good thing, but a necessity for students studying law. She observes that struggle should be embraced and not equated with failure. She also describes the strategies she has implemented into her own practicum in order to ensure the success of her students within law school and beyond. Christopher is on Twitter at @cassiechristop.

This episode was hosted by SJ Morrison, a law student at the Duquesne University School of Law. Morrison is on Twitter at @SJMilliron.